Setting goals has always been something I enjoy. Achieving them is okay, but it’s more the setting. They’re kind of like working out some new way to organize the files on your desktop or some new workflow for handling to-dos. They make you feel like you’re getting somewhere, even though in reality it rarely makes a difference.

Despite that, just like sometimes a reorganized desktop does make you more productive, I believe setting goals can lead to better outcomes.

Launch personal project

Sometime last year I came across an idea for a web site that felt like it had ten times more potential than anything else I had ever come up with.

In other words, it’s feasible.

More importantly, it was an idea I was enthusiastic about because it aligns with my passions. I’ve done a terrible job of doing any work on it recently, but my goal still stands: launching 2012.

Start MBA

This is a follow on to my goal last year to take the GMAT. At this rate I’ll have my MBA by 2023.

Respond within 24 hours

A repeat of last year. If you know me, you know this goal will probably be needed every year.

Coordinate church prayers

In my church I’m responsible for coordinating the opening and closing prayer (or “invocation” and “benediction” if you’re like that) every week. I hate doing it. And I’m really good at not doing things I hate.

I’m supposed to call around and ask people beforehand, but sometime last year I slipped into just waiting until the morning of and asking whoever got to church early. My goal for this year is to actually do what I’m supposed to and coordinate them ahead of time. So far I’m doing pretty well with this one.

Blog once a week

Check! Well, for this week, at least. Part of the logic behind this goal was that I had 51 drafts in WordPress, almost one a week. I think I’m at around 60 drafts now so this should be easy, right? If I had to prioritize my goals this would be near the top.

Run three times a week

Wow. Yeah, um. I’ve run once? Maybe I meant three times a year.

Let’s just pretend it’s January.